cannamoms tendance

“Cannamoms”: mothers who swear by cannabis

More and more women are using microdoses of cannabis to relax. They believe it helps them to be more available mothers to their children, reports the BBC website.

What if using cannabis helps you be a better parent? According to the BBC, more and more women are defining themselves as “cannamoms” and defending this point of view.

An American journalist started the trend

This is the case of Danielle Simone Brand, an American journalist who got into it in 2016, when California legalized consumption for adults. This mother of two children aged 8 and 11 even made a book about it, published in December 2020, Weed Mom: The Canna-Curious Woman’s Guide to Healthier Relaxation, Happier Parenting, and Chilling TF Out (“Maman Beuh: le guide de la femme canna-curieuse pour une relaxation plus saine, une parentalité plus heureuse et pour une p* de détente”).

In it, Brand explains that cannabis helps her not to be overwhelmed by the mental load of daily tasks and to have more patience and availability for her children.

This phenomenon is actually not new, but it seems to be growing judging by the number of “cannamoms” groups on social networks. Heather McIlvaine-Newsad, a professor of anthropology at Western Illinois University, is part of an interdisciplinary research project on cannabis and culture. She became aware in 2018 of Facebook groups about cannabis and parenting. Some had existed for many years and there are nearly 30 in all, each with thousands of members.

Latrese Thomas, a 40-year-old African-American mother of three, told the BBC that she uses cannabis “the same way others drink wine.” She added that, in the context of racial tensions particularly affecting the black community, cannabis “helped her control [her] anxiety as a mom – and not just as a black woman, but as a mom of black kids.” Many women also explain that their use has helped them cope with the stress of Covid and health measures.

The key: always microdose

The key, they all say, is to microdose. The BBC insists that there are no conclusive scientific studies on the effects of microdosing in the medium or long term, but it is certain that it can affect concentration and disrupt certain motor functions.

Precisely, all the consumers interviewed by the BBC mention the frowns they observe when they talk about their lifestyle. Latrese Thomas is aware of this and is careful who she talks to about it, especially since she is black, she points out. Heather McIlvaine-Newsad sums it up this way:

“It’s socially acceptable for a mother to say ‘Mommy needs a little glass of wine,’ but it’s still not acceptable to say ‘Mommy needs a microdose of cannabis.'”

Nevertheless, mentalities seem to be changing, especially with the arrival of a generation that has seen its parents but also its grandparents take cannabis. The “cannamoms” would thus have beautiful days before them.

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